97th DOG Annual Meeting 1999

K187

PHOTOREFRACTIVE KERATECTOMY (PRK) IN LOW MYOPIA AND MYOPIC ASTIGMATISM: BROAD-BEAM VERSUS FLYING-SPOT LASER TECHNOLOGY

G. W. K. Steinkamp, G. Wellermann, T. Kohnen, E.-M. Schnitzler, M. Baumeister, C. Ohrloff

After the generation of broad-beam excimer lasers, new laser systems with flying-spot technology were introduced. We examined the results of both laser systems after photorefractive/photoastigmatic refractive keratectomy (PRK/PARK).

Methods: Fourty-nine eyes (37 patients) were treated with the Keracor 217 excimer laser (Technolas/Bausch&Lomb, Software Planoscan), fourty-six eyes (29 patients) were treated with the VISX 20/20 excimer laser (Version 4.0). The preoperative spherical equivalent in all patients was -6.00 diopters (D) or lower. The central ablation zone with the VISX laser was 6.0 mm, whereas the ablation zone using the Keracor 217 ranged between 6.0 and 7.0 mm. Safety, efficacy, stability and predictability were examined 1, 4 and 12 months after PRK.

Results: For safety, efficacy, and predictability no significant differences could be observed between the two laser systems. Stable refractive values were measured after four months in the group treated with the VISX 20/20 excimer laser and after one month in patients treated with the Keracor 217 excimer laser.

Conclusion: Both the broad-beam and the flying-spot laser showed good results in treating low myopia and myopic astigmatism using PRK. No fundamental differences between the two excimer laser could be observed.

Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Dept. of Ophthalmolgy, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt/Germany


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